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dc.contributor.advisorAlkadhi, Karim A.
dc.creatorAlhaider, Ibrahim
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-27T15:54:56Z
dc.date.available2012-09-27T15:54:56Z
dc.date.created2010-05
dc.date.issued2012-09-27
dc.date.submittedMay 2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/ETD-UH-2010-05-31
dc.description.abstractStudy objectives: Accumulating evidence has shown that caffeine and sleep deprivation have opposing effects on learning and memory; therefore, this study was undertaken to provide a detailed account of the effect of chronic, low-dose caffeine treatment on the deleterious effects of sleep loss on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Experimental design: We investigated the effects of chronic (4 weeks) caffeine treatment (0.3 g/l in drinking water) on memory impairment in acutely (24 hr) sleep-deprived rats. Sleep deprivation was induced using the modified multiple platform model. The effects of caffeine on sleep deprivation-induced hippocampus-dependent learning and memory deficits were studied using three approaches: learning and memory performance in the radial arm water maze task; electrophysiological recordings in the Cornu Ammonis (CA1) and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus; and western blot analysis to measure the levels of memory- and synaptic plasticity-related signaling molecules. Results: Our results showed that chronic caffeine treatment prevented impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning, short-term memory and early phase- long-term potentiation (E-LTP) of the CA1 and DG areas in the sleep-deprived rats. In correlation, caffeine treatment prevented a sleep deprivation-associated decrease in the basal levels of phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (P-CaMKII) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In addition, caffeine treatment of sleep-deprived rats increased the levels of P-CaMKII during the expression of E-LTP. The results also showed that chronic caffeine treatment prevented the impairment of long-term memory and late phase-LTP (L-LTP) in the CA1 and DG regions of the sleep-deprived rats. Additionally, caffeine treatment prevented a sleep deprivation-associated decrease in the basal levels of the phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (P-CREB) as well as total CREB. Treating sleep-deprived rats chronically with caffeine enables multiple high frequency stimulation to increase the levels of P-CREB during L-LTP expression. Conclusions: The results suggest that long-term use of a low dose of caffeine protects against the harmful changes in the basal levels of P-CaMKII, P-CREB and BDNF associated with sleep deprivation and as a result contributes to the revival of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as LTP in the CA1 and DG regions.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectcaffeine
dc.subjectsleep deprivation
dc.subjectmemory
dc.subjecthippocampus
dc.subjectlong-term potentiation
dc.subjectspatial memory
dc.subjectCREB
dc.subjectCaMKII
dc.subjectCA1 area
dc.subjectDG area.
dc.titleTHE PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CHRONIC CAFFEINE TREATMENT ON THE COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY IN ACUTE SLEEP DEPRIVATION
dc.date.updated2012-09-27T15:55:03Z
dc.identifier.slug10657/ETD-UH-2010-05-31
dc.type.materialtext*
dc.type.genrethesis*
thesis.degree.namePharmacology (Ph.D.)
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentPharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLau, Vincent
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHussain, Tahir
dc.contributor.committeeMemberLeasure, J Leigh
dc.contributor.committeeMemberAleisa, Abdulaziz


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