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dc.contributor.advisorCampion, James
dc.creatorHanvey, Chester
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-19T14:02:40Z
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-19T14:02:41Z
dc.date.available2012-04-19T14:02:40Z
dc.date.available2012-04-19T14:02:41Z
dc.date.created2011-12
dc.date.issued2012-04-19
dc.date.submittedDecember 2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10657/244
dc.description.abstractMost I/O psychologists consider the realm of organizational legal issues to be almost entirely comprised of discrimination-related issues. However, the wave of recent wage and hour lawsuits (governed by the FLSA) has inspired some practitioners to begin applying I/O techniques, such as job analysis, to help employers avoid lawsuits or to provide evidence for existing lawsuits. Despite recognition of the high costs of misclassifying employees as managerial (i.e., salaried), organizations continue to face this allegation with increasing frequency. In this study, I investigated a potential cause of employee non-compliance with FLSA regulations. Using a VIE motivational framework, I hypothesized that company performance appraisal and reward systems may unintentionally motivate employees to perform tasks that jeopardize the organization’s compliance with FLSA regulations. Overall results did not support my hypotheses. Time spent on certain non-exempt tasks was not related to performance scores. Possible explanations for these results are discussed.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectJob Analysis
dc.subjectlegal issues
dc.subjectFLSA
dc.subjectexemption
dc.subjectperformance appraisal
dc.subjectcompensation
dc.subjectexempt
dc.subjectwage and hour
dc.titleRewarding Non-Compliant Behavior in Organizations: The Role of Appraisal and Reward Systems on Employee Compliance with FLSA Regulations
dc.date.updated2012-04-19T14:02:42Z
dc.type.materialtext*
dc.type.genrethesis*
thesis.degree.namePsychology-I/O
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial/Organizational
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Houston
thesis.degree.departmentPsychology
dc.contributor.committeeMemberYork, Mary
dc.contributor.committeeMemberKieffer, Suzanne
dc.contributor.committeeMemberBanks, Cristina


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