Using B Cell Characteristics as Predictors of Multiple Sclerosis in Clinically Isolated Syndrome Patients

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Title: Using B Cell Characteristics as Predictors of Multiple Sclerosis in Clinically Isolated Syndrome Patients
Author: Cameron, Elizabeth
Abstract: Clinically isolated syndrome (CIS ) is the diagnosis of patients who have experienced a single event due to nerve demyelination of the white matter of the central nervous system . This can be due to numerous causes , both autoimmune and infectious . We hypothesized that CIS patients with B cell characteristics like those seen in multiple sclerosis (MS ) patients would develop clinically definite MS . We have determined that , like MS patients , several CIS patients have an increased frequency of VH4 -expressing CD19 \super + \nosupersub B cells in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF ) compared to peripheral B cells from healthy donors (HCPB ) or CSF B cells from patients with neurological diseases not related to MS . However , VH4 bias was a moderate predictor for conversion to MS . Nevertheless , detailed analysis of antibody V -gene repertoires revealed eight codons that are significantly more mutated in the MS CSF than HCPB VH4 -expressing B cells . This MS -specific antibody signature includes 25 % of all mutations within the repertoires of CSF -derived B cells from MS patients . We then used the prevalence of this signature to predict if CIS patients converted to MS within two years of repertoire sampling . Indeed , we accurately predicted conversion to MS in 10 of 11 CIS patients . The B cell VH4 antibody signature can potentially be used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool for MS .
URI: http : / /hdl .handle .net /2152 .5 /571
Date: 2009-06-15

Citation

Using B Cell Characteristics as Predictors of Multiple Sclerosis in Clinically Isolated Syndrome Patients. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Available electronically from http : / /hdl .handle .net /2152 .5 /571 .

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