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dc.contributor.advisorMihalic, Angelaen
dc.creatorBustamante, Nirma Doraen
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T18:36:56Zen
dc.date.available2012-03-27T18:36:56Zen
dc.date.issued2012-03-27en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152.5/969en
dc.description.abstractMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the cause to some of the most common infections in the world. Its molecular distribution does not show the dissemination of one global strain. Studies show that, although community-acquired MRSA is more common in the United States, hospital-acquired MRSA still continues to be the most common pathogen around the world. Antibiotic resistance rates confirm that antibiotic availability is what continues to fuel the presence of MRSA. My experience abroad was a firsthand example of how the lack of resources in lower developed countries has affected the medical practice of physicians in those countries.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subjectMethicillin Resistanceen
dc.subjectMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureusen
dc.titleMRSA: A Global Threaten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.type.materialTexten
thesis.degree.grantorUT Southwestern Medical Centeren
thesis.degree.departmentUT Southwestern Medical Schoolen
thesis.degree.nameM.D. with Distinctionen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineInternational Healthen
thesis.date.available2012-01-23en
dc.identifier.oclc781860970en


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