Now showing items 21-40 of 57

    • 1.034 

      Zeiss, Carl. (2012-02-07)
      The instrument sits on a horseshoe base and a slotted rectangular pillar supports the stage and tubular limb. Below the stage are a rotating double mirror, a swinging platform for the iris diaphragm (which moves on the ...
    • 1.030 

      Ross, Andrew. (2012-02-07)
      The binocular compound microscope is a variation on the Ross- Zentmayer instrument described above (Ross 5062). It features an A-shaped, tripod foot which supports the double pillars. The limb, attached to the pillars by ...
    • 1.032 

      Zeiss, Carl. (2012-02-07)
      The oldest Zeiss instrument in the collection is a small microscope with a horseshoe base and a round pillar. The body-tube is attached to the pillar by a short arm and focusing is by the screw on top of the pillar. A ...
    • 1.015 

      Ladd, William. (2012-02-07)
      The tripod base, consisting of a tubular structure, supports the limb, which carries the body-tube, stage, condenser, and mirror. Focusing is by the fusee chain mechanism. It sits on a wooden platform and comes with ...
    • 1.046 

      Leitz, Ernst. (2012-02-07)
      The horseshoe-shaped foot and the pillar are cast as one piece. The curved limb supports the square stage and the body-tube with a triple nosepiece. Coarse focusing is by rackwork and fine adjustment by micrometer screw. ...
    • 1.042 

      Oberhaeuser, Georges. (2012-02-07)
      This early instrument, with a horseshoe-shaped base, has a brass body-tube that moves on the rackwork and is attached to the limb by a short arm. The pillar supports the stage and the limb. The instrument is also fitted ...
    • 1.007 

      Nachet, Camille Sebastien (1799-1881). (2012-02-07)
      This small microscope has a solid brass base that supports the short tubal pillar. The limb carries the stage, with a dove tail slide underneath, and a body-tube with cone nose. The instrument dates from about 1860, as ...
    • 1.031 

      Ross, Andrew. (2012-02-07)
      This model was designed by Francis Herbert Wenham (1824-1908) at a time when interest in oblique illumination was high. It was called "Wenham's Universal Inclining and Rotating Microscope." The main components are of ...
    • 1.053 

      James W. Queen & Company. (2012-02-07)
      This small microscope has a Y-shaped foot and double pillars of cast iron (cast as one piece) and painted black. The curved limb supports the body-tube, which moves by rackwork. The body is fitted with a draw-tube and a ...
    • 1.052 

      Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. (2012-02-07)
      The horseshoe base and the pillar, cast as one piece, and the limb are made of iron and painted black. The brass arm supports the body-tube, which has a triple nosepiece. The coarse adjustment is by rackwork, and the screw ...
    • 1.028 

      Ross, Andrew. (2012-02-07)
      This binocular compound microscope is very similar to the above instrument (Ross 4046), except for its rotating stage. Also referred to as the Ross-Zentmayer microscope, it incorporates a swinging stage, a feature patented ...
    • 1.041 

      Cuff, John. (2012-02-07)
      This unsigned, Cuff-type microscope is attributed to Tiedemann of Stuttgart. The instrument is attached to the box-foot by a beveled rectangular brass base. The curved pillar supports the limb, to which are attached the ...
    • 1.008 

      Shuttleworth, Henry. (2012-02-07)
      This Cuff-type instrument has a tubular pillar which supports the body-tube, stage, and the mirror. It is attached to a wooden box fitted with two drawers. The stage and the mirror move by rackwork. Accessories include ...
    • 1.082 

      Long, Joseph. (2012-02-07)
      This instrument represents the finest example of its type prior to the development of achromatic microscopes. The main components are folded and packed, with complete accessories, in a mahogany box, lined with maroon velvet. ...
    • 1.020 

      James Swift & Son. (2012-02-07)
      The dissecting microscope has a large brass stage with hand rests (covered with leather). It is mounted on a pair of straight legs and a curved foot in the back. The binocular body is attached to the limb by an arm, with ...
    • 1.018 

      Negretti & Zambra. (2012-02-07)
      This large compound binocular microscope is a variation on the popular Ross model (see our instrument 1.025, Ross 563). The Y-shaped foot supports the vertical double pillars, attached to the boxy limb by means of trunnions. ...
    • 1.004 

      Dollond, John. (2012-02-07)
      This Ellis-Type Aquatic microscope has a tubular pillar attached to the box-foot. The pillar supports the stage, mirror, and an optical system consisting of a single lens. The instrument is also fitted with a screw-barrel ...
    • 1.017 

      Pillischer, Moritz. (2012-02-07)
      This early instrument by Pillischer sits on a flat solid base (Y-shaped, with a short stem), supporting flat pillars which curve forward. The arched limb is attached to a platform that holds the stage, and is fitted with ...
    • 1.024 

      Ross, Andrew. (2012-02-07)
      This compound monocular microscope is the earliest Ross instrument in the collection, and may be one of the four known to have survived. The limb, which supports the body-tube and stage, is attached to the pillar by a ...
    • 1.037 

      Powell & Lealand. (2012-02-07)
      Based on a new model introduced in 1843, this all brass instrument rests on a tripod, with the limb moving on the trunnions and supporting the body-tube and stage. The model served as the basis of the company's instrument ...