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dc.contributor.advisor Olson, Beth
dc.creator Lopez, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-10T14:53:06Z
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-10T14:53:10Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-10T14:53:06Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-10T14:53:10Z
dc.date.created 2010-12
dc.date.issued 2012-01-10
dc.date.submitted December 2010
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10657/173
dc.description.abstract Research on representation of gender in 20th century media suggests that traditional attitudes towards gender, which call for aggressive, dominant male behavior and passive, submissive female behavior, have been propagated through negative framing of characters who challenge those attitudes. Traditional attitudes have been especially prominent in fantasy tales, though some research suggests that contemporary (third-wave feminist era) fantasy does support alternative views. A quantitative study of fantasy films of the era reveals that characters who challenged tradition were still more likely to be framed negatively than those who did not. Qualitative analysis was then used to determine the reasons for, and the significance of this continued correlation.
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.subject Gender
dc.subject Gender Roles
dc.subject Jung
dc.subject Feminism
dc.subject Fantasy
dc.subject Film
dc.title Animus, Anima, and Shadow: Gender Role Representation in Fantasy Films of the Third Wave Feminist Era
dc.date.updated 2012-01-10T14:53:11Z
dc.type.material text *
dc.type.genre thesis *
thesis.degree.name Communication Sciences and Disorders
thesis.degree.level Masters
thesis.degree.discipline Mass Communication
thesis.degree.grantor University of Houston
thesis.degree.department School of Communication
dc.contributor.committeeMember Haun, Martha
dc.contributor.committeeMember Verheyen, Claremarie

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