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dc.contributor.authorHan, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorGill, GAen_US
dc.contributor.otherEnvironmental Science & Technologyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T16:46:07Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T16:46:07Z
dc.date.issued1 Sep. 2005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1969.3/18523
dc.descriptionpgs. 6607-6615en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile many studies have examined Hg(II) binding ligand in natural dissolved organic matter, determined ligand concentrations far exceed natural Hg(II) concentrations. This ligand class may not influence natural Hg(II) complexation, given the reverse relation between ligand concentration and metal-ligand binding strength. This study used a new competing ligand, thiosalicylic acid, in a competitive ligand exchange method in which water-toluene extraction was used to determine extremely strong Hg(II) binding sites in estuarine and coastal waters (dissolved [Hg] = 0.5-8 pM). Thiosalicylic acid competition lowered the detection limit of Hg(II) complexing ligand by 2 orders of magnitude from values found by previous studies; the determined Hg(II) complexing ligand ranged from 13 to 103 pM. The logarithmic conditional stability constants between Hg(II) and Hg(II) complexing ligand (K sub(cond') = [HgL]/([Hg super(2+)][L']), [L'] = total [L] - [HgL]) ranged from 26.5 to 29.0. Applying the same method for chloride competition detected another class of ligand that is present from 0.5 to 9.6 nM with log conditional stability constants ranging from 23.1 to 24.4. A linear relationship was observed between the log conditional stability constant and log Hg(II) complexing ligand concentration, supporting the hypothesis that Hg(II) binding ligand should be characterized as a series or continuum of binding sites on natural dissolved organic matter. Calculating Hg(II) complexation using the conditional stability constants and ligand concentrations determined in this study indicates that >99% of the dissolved mercury is complexed by natural ligand associated with dissolved organic matter in estuarine and coastal waters of Galveston Bay, Texas.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://gbic.tamug.edu/request.htmen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries10047.00en_US
dc.relation.urien_US
dc.subjectbaysen_US
dc.subjectbrackish wateren_US
dc.subjectchloridesen_US
dc.subjectcoastal watersen_US
dc.subjectdetection limitsen_US
dc.subjectdissolved organic matteren_US
dc.subjectestauriesen_US
dc.subjectheavy metalsen_US
dc.subjectligandsen_US
dc.subjectmarine environmenten_US
dc.subjectmercuryen_US
dc.subjectorganic matteren_US
dc.subjectpollutant identificationen_US
dc.subjectwater analysisen_US
dc.titleDetermination of Mercury Complexation in Coastal and Estuarine Waters Using Competitive Ligand Exchange Methoden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.placeen_US
dc.seriesen_US
dc.vol-issue39(17)en_US
dc.geo-codeGalveston Bayen_US
dc.locationNot available in house - Please contact GBIC for assistanceen_US
dc.scaleen_US
dc.latitudeen_US
dc.longitudeen_US
dc.contract-noen_US
dc.notesen_US
dc.degreeen_US
dc.acquisition-srcen_US
dc.description-otheren_US
dc.universityen_US
dc.history1-15-09 kswen_US
dc.call-noen_US


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